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Congress Agrees to End ERC

As of January 31, 2024, businesses are no longer able to file new ERC claims. If you have already filed with another provider and are feeling unsure about your claim, we are now offering gratis second opinions.

Reach out to our experts today at [email protected]

Federal Refunds for Businesses

Because COVID mandates forced businesses in to make operational changes during the pandemic, the federal government is providing cash refunds through the Employee Retention Credit. But what most businesses don’t understand is that NOT ALL businesses qualify for this incentive.

You don’t qualify just because the pandemic impacted your business. Your industry, state, and circumstances determine whether you qualify for this credit and for how much.
Because COVID mandates forced businesses to make operational changes during the pandemic, the federal government is providing cash refunds to them. If you have not claimed refunds for your business, time is running out. You are qualified if you faced any of the following impacts:
  • Full or partial government-mandated shutdowns;
  • Capacity limitations;
  • Supply chain issues;
  • Decrease in working hours to sanitize facilities;
  • Shift in hours of operation; and
  • Decrease in revenue.

Federal Refunds for Businesses

Because COVID mandates forced businesses in to make operational changes during the pandemic, the federal government is providing cash refunds through the Employee Retention Credit. But what most businesses don’t understand is that NOT ALL businesses qualify for this incentive.

You don’t qualify just because the pandemic impacted your business. Your industry, state, and circumstances determine whether you qualify for this credit and for how much.
Because COVID mandates forced businesses to make operational changes during the pandemic, the federal government is providing cash refunds to them. If you have not claimed refunds for your business, time is running out. You are qualified if you faced any of the following impacts:
  • Full or partial government-mandated shutdowns;
  • Capacity limitations;
  • Supply chain issues;
  • Decrease in working hours to sanitize facilities;
  • Shift in hours of operation; and
  • Decrease in revenue.

Need help with the employee
retention credit?

Fill out the form to receive more information

ERC | GEO Contact-Us | Employees Optional

Contact us to receive more information about the Employee Retention Credit

By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Federal Refunds for Businesses

Because COVID mandates forced businesses to make operational changes during the pandemic, the federal government is providing cash refunds to them. If you have not claimed refunds for your business, time is running out. You are qualified if you faced any of the following impacts:
  • Full or partial government-mandated shutdowns;
  • Capacity limitations;
  • Supply chain issues;
  • Decrease in working hours to sanitize facilities;
  • Shift in hours of operation; and
  • Decrease in revenue.

Schedule a free consultation with our team
of experts to learn more!

What is the

Employee Retention Credit?

The Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERC) is a refundable tax credit designed to reward business owners for retaining employees throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, many business owners are receiving bad advice on how they qualify. The ERC is still the most powerful incentive available but it must be appropriately documented and calculated. It is critical to understand the most common misunderstandings surrounding this credit.

alliantgroup has helped thousands of SMBs claim the ERC tax credit and earn refunds to invest back in their business.

6 ERC Myths and Misunderstandings

Many American businesses have been slow to evaluate and quick to disqualify themselves for the ERC. Companies can receive substantial refunds for taxes already paid by claiming this incentive, even if their business:

5 Things to Know about the ERC

To help you cut through the noise, we’re debunking the most common misunderstandings currently circulating in the ERC world. You should know that:

Why alliantgroup?

We are the leading experts in tax credits and incentives. Since 2002, we have helped US businesses grow their operations and stay ahead of the competition. To date, we have delivered billions in refunds to over 27,000 businesses.

800+ Industry Experts

Our professionals know your business inside and out and know what qualifies to ensure the most lucrative refund. No other firm offers professionals versed in your industry.

Four Former IRS and Division Commissioners

Our former commissioners are the preeminent experts on IRS policy and ensure our practices and procedures align with the service’s expectations. No other firm offers this level
of oversight.

Former Legislators

Our former policymakers understand the intent of tax law and why they apply to your business. As part of our team, they advocate for our clients and help them take advantage of federal funds. No other firm understands tax law to this extent.

Why Businesses Choose alliantgroup

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Understanding Your State's Mandates

Your state had several orders that may have impacted your business. The list below is not exhaustive but if you had to abide by any of the following you should start your claim process now.

Michigan’s Stay at Home order required workers of all non-essential businesses to remain at home. Even essential businesses faced restrictions similar to the following:

  • Determining critical infrastructure workers and informing them (i.e., health workers, government personnel, and volunteers);
  • In-person activities suspended until normalcy returns; and
  • Businesses and operations needed to follow social distancing and other safety measures to protect workers and clients.
  • Businesses couldn’t operate if their workers needed to leave their places of residence except if those workers were necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations;
  • Businesses and operations that employed critical infrastructure workers could continue in-person operations; and
  • Michigan’s Executive Order 2020-42 was only one of the extensions of the state’s Stay at Home order and while it allowed some businesses to start operations, it still retained restrictions on those operations.
  • Businesses couldn’t operate if their workers needed to leave their places of residence except if those workers were necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations;
  • Businesses and operations that employed critical infrastructure workers could continue in-person operations.
  • People were instructed to avoid frequenting bars, restaurants, and food courts, or visiting gyms or massage parlors; provided, however, that the use of drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options was allowed and highly encouraged throughout the limited duration of this executive order; and
  • Texas’ Stay at Home order required non-essential workers to remain at home. This affected the majority of businesses in the state, and even essential businesses had limitations on their ability to operate as normal.
  • Everyone was instructed to minimize social gatherings and in-person contact, except where necessary to provide or obtain essential services; and
  • The Governor’s Executive Order GA-14, further extended the stay at home order and while it relaxed some restrictions, most businesses were forced to operate at less than 100% capacity.
  • Every person in Texas was instructed to minimize social gatherings and minimize in-person contact; and
  • People and businesses were told to follow the minimum standard health protocols recommended by DSHS and implement social distancing, remote working, and practice good hygiene, environmental cleanliness, and sanitation.
  • Residents were required to stay inside their residences and limit all movement outside of their homes beyond what is necessary to take care of “essential needs.”
  • Reopening of both lower and higher-risk businesses followed public health measures set by local jurisdictions that came from the State Public Health Officer; and
  • The Public Health Directive order continued Stay at Home orders with limited openings of low risk businesses. The State Public Health Officer was given authority to set restrictions on all businesses that were opened.
  • “Stay at Home” Order in California’s Pandemic Resilience Roadmap identified four stages of the pandemic: safety and preparation (Stage 1), reopening of lower-risk workplaces and other spaces (Stage 2), reopening of higher-risk workplaces and other spaces (Stage 3), and easing of final restrictions leading to the end of the Stay at Home order (Stage 4);
  • The framework for reopening of businesses followed a set of Tiers, where businesses will be opened based on risk-based criteria pertinent to each sector; and
  • While the Blueprint was designed to allow more businesses to open, it also established limitations, such as capacity restrictions on indoor areas based on a tier system and stage system.
  • All state office buildings were closed to the public, but essential state functions continued; and
  • All individuals were directed to stay home unless performing an essential activity.
  • Restaurants, gyms, entertainment zones, and movie theatres were instructed to cease all operations;
  • Many businesses were forced to close, particularly those with indoor areas open to the public; and
  • Critical infrastructure employees shall maintain strict social distancing between themselves and the members of the public.
  • Minnesota’s Stay at Home order required all non-essential workers to remain in their homes. Even essential workers and those allowed to leave for exempted purposes were restricted in their activities as per the guidelines of the Minnesota Department of Health and the Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Standards.
  • Executive Order 20-48 eased Stay at Home orders but established restrictions on businesses. This included social distancing and work-from-home requirements.
  • Executive order 20-103 removed the prohibition on social gatherings but still required capacity limitations on indoor and outdoor areas. Establishments that served food and drinks were ordered to ensure social distancing and limited hours of operation.
  • The order stated that individuals currently residing in the state had to avoid leaving their homes or places of residence unless necessary.
  • Non-essential businesses were closed and capacity restrictions and guidelines were set on businesses that remained operational.
  • The state later eased Stay at Home orders but every business still faced restrictions and capacity limitations. The state also curtailed the hours during which businesses could operate.
  • There were several extensions of the state’s lockdown orders including EO No. 244, which continued the State of Emergency and prolonged Stay at Home orders.
  • Restaurants, gyms, entertainment zones and movie theatres were instructed to cease all operations; and
  • Many businesses were forced to close, particularly those with indoor areas open to the public. Even essential businesses faced restrictions.
  • Businesses were instructed to minimize in-person contact and reduce the number of personnel on site.
  • Non-essential gatherings were limited to 50 people, where indoor events could happen at 50% capacity.
  • The Order prohibited mass gatherings and directed a statewide closure of K-12 public schools.
  • Additional limitations on mass gatherings, restrictions on venues, and long-term care facilities were proclaimed through this state order.
  • Residents were required to stay inside their residences and limit all movement outside of their homes beyond what is necessary to take care of “essential needs.”
  • Non-essential workers were forced to stay home and public gatherings were banned. Even essential businesses faced restrictions on their operations.
  • Ohio’s Department of Health ordered several extensions of the Stay at Home orders.
  • As Ohio eased Stay at Home orders, Covid restrictions such as capacity restrictions and sanitation requirements affected even essential businesses.
  • All counties in the state faced restrictions and capacity limitations, which also curtailed the hours during which businesses could operate; and
  • Non-essential businesses were closed, and capacity restrictions and guidelines were set on businesses that remained operational.
  • In preparation for elective surgeries and procedures, all hospitals and surgical centers had to administer a COVID-19 test; and
  • Hospitals and medical centers established partnerships with private labs to process COVID-19 tests on all patients prior to performing a procedure.
  • All non-life sustaining businesses were instructed to close. Even essential businesses were subjected to social distancing orders and mitigation measures, which limited their ability to function at full strength.
  • Even after Pennsylvania loosened Stay at Home orders, businesses that were opened still faced heavy restrictions such as sanitation requirements, staggered hours, social distancing and capacity limits.
  • When public venues were allowed to open to the public, there were heavy capacity restrictions. Indoor events could only operate at 15% of capacity and outdoor events could only operate at 20% of capacity.
  • Businesses were instructed to minimize in-person contact and reduce the number of personnel on-site.
  • Many businesses were forced to close, particularly those with indoor areas open to the public. Even essential businesses faced restrictions.

The Stay at Home order required workers of all non-essential businesses to remain at home. Even essential businesses faced restrictions similar to the following:

  • Determining critical infrastructure workers and informing them (i.e., health workers, government personnel, and volunteers);
  • In-person activities suspended until specified otherwise; and
  • Businesses and operations needed to follow social distancing and other safety measures to protect workers and clients.

The following were directed through this Order:

  • The order limited social gatherings to groups of 10 people or less to follow Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines.
  • Closing of restaurants or providing drive-thru, take-out, pick-up, or delivery, bars, clubs, theaters, entertainment centers and visitor attractions.
  • The state faced restrictions and capacity limitations, which also curtailed the hours during which businesses could operate.
  • Non-essential businesses were closed, and capacity restrictions and guidelines were set on businesses that remained operational.
  • Restrictions on mass gatherings, venues and long-term care facilities were proclaimed through this state order.
  • Public-facing businesses in the state faced CDC-mandated restrictions and capacity limitations, which also curtailed the hours during which businesses could operate.
  • Non-essential businesses were closed, and capacity restrictions and guidelines were set on businesses that remained operational.
  • Many businesses were forced to close, particularly those with indoor areas open to the public. Even essential businesses faced restrictions to minimize in-person contact and reduce the number of personnel on-site.

real client examples

Restaurant
Annual Revenue:

$74 Million

No. of Employees:

317

TOTAL CREDITS EARNED:

$1 Million

Fitness Facility
Annual Revenue:

$1.3 Million

No. of Employees:

58

TOTAL CREDITS EARNED:

$237,000

Manufacturing Firm
Annual Revenue:

$17 Million

No. of Employees:

46

TOTAL CREDITS EARNED:

$217,000

By

Dean Zerbe

Former Senior Counsel to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCE

Top 5 ERC Mistakes to Avoid

ERC | Top 5 ERC Mistakes to Avoid | Forbes Article

Contact us to receive more information about the Employee Retention Credit

By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

By clicking Submit, I agree to the use of my personal data in accordance with alliantgroup Privacy Policy. alliantgroup will not sell, trade, lease, or rent your personal data to third parties.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

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